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operation since apardth d apartheid. it raised questions about the country's leadership and power of the anc which was once unquestionably a party of the peel. with more, mike hanna in johan he johanesbur g. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. an awarenets of challenges to come. the growing death between rich and poor is the most brutal reminder that mandela's promise of a better life is still to be realized. >> i think the challenge we have doesn't necessarily need man dela. it needs us in south africa to face the reality if we don't do something very logical, the why unpeople are going to revolt because if they remain poor, and a few become richer, the young people will revolt. if the fault lines within south african society have been too clear in recent times, a labor dispute that resulted in the killing of more than 30 americana last year. many argue the root cause of such violence is an africans national congress government that has lost touch with those who put it in power. >> if you look at what has been happening over the last few years in terms of public violence, you
of the nation, aimed at civil installations and not soft or human targets but in times can, the anc their acts bore no comparison to the thousands murdered in otherwise disappeared by the regime. >> there are many people whofeed futile for us to continue talkintalking peace and nonviole against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. well i'm on the defenseless people. >> in 1962 a vishz crack downwas caught up in the regime's wide net. his anc colleagues were rounded up and jailed. in 1963 during what came to be called the ravonia trial, the government tried and convicted mandela and seven of the top command of the anc on charges of sabotage and fomenting revolution. a capital offense. the eight were sentenced to life in prison. even from his cell on robin island, the alcatraz like island, six miles from cape town, mandela was uncompromising, says helen, a parliament service person. >> mattresses, the fact that thr between, and mostly about the behavior of the war den who has a tattoo on the back of his hands of the swastika. he says this man is very bad, he treats us badly. >> but e
, was release all nt a.n.c. leaders, which were also an robin island, including governor mbecki. we were political opponens. we were opposing each other with regard to the potential vote when an election came up. secondly, mostly around the issue of ongoing political violent. tensions grew between us at times to high levels. at all times, notwithstanding the intentions, we found it possible to rise above them when approached by my negotiators to find solutions and prevent negotiations from stalling. nelson mandela - he was a very special man. i think nothing is being overplayed. i think he is held in high - the highest esteem. not only by the overwhelming majority of south africans, but worldwide. i think he's a towering figure of the past century. therefore, i think we should pay him the tribe ute and the honour which he'd like - lay the foundation his integrity, his emphasis on the need for reconciliation - all that make him the icon that he has become. >> a tribute from f.w. de klerk, a deputy president when nelson mandela became president. preparations to say farewell have been made
of reaction from friends. , manyiends from the anc of whom were in prison with him. they are really paying tribute did topast and what he make south africa the nation it is today. so far it is a quiet, somber mood. people are doing their best to highlight what he did for the country. well on the positives. >> happens next? -- what happens next? >> always know so far and this is from state tv broadcast is flown tobody has been militia hospital. we are expecting an announcement shortly telling us what the funeral arrangements will be. when everything will take place. i suspect a lot of international leaders will start arriving in the country for the funeral and we are expecting a rather long process where the nation will reflect on his life and there events lots of culminating in a few days time. >> thank you so much for all of that. we will keep on crossing live to johannesburg for the paris latest. back. the office at goldman sachs joins us with more on nelson mandela's impact on the country. >> a number of big stories to focus on. later today we will get the u.s. jobs reports. our markets
escape? >> not in our time, ever. but very good plans. >> b wing is where all the key anc prisoners were held. so the man was here in this room. this room was his cell. >> from 1964 up until 1979, they were given this. >> two meters by two meters, the mat on the floor, no bed until his final years, a bucket and a precious window to the outside world. my guide has often gazed from mandela's window before. but today, he becomes overwhelmed by tears. >> an incredible life. >> yes. >> surviving this was critical. >> yes. >> and they tried everything to humiliate him? >> all the things. they did everything. trying to break him down. they even use his family. >> when he looked out of his window, mandela's solace was his small garden along the prison wall. he planted this tree and sat beneath the vine he nurtured from the courtyard grid. on his last year on robben island, mandela was allowed to work here cape town, tantalizingly close. surviving robben island, to emerge preaching both hope and forgiveness, utterly central to mandela's position here and across the world. they are bound up in tha
to the truth. the united states was against the anc, the african national congress, because they were communists, they were backed by the ussr, and the united states being staunchly anti-communist, that's the right team, but they might have made the wrong choice. likewise, nelson mandela mail d the same exact mistake. he embraced countries like cuba, he misidentified them as comrades, when it should have been the people in the countries he identified with, because they were people under the thumb of gadhafi and under the thumb of khomeini and other nondemocratic countries. one thing you learned is how ideology at times can blind you to some very important facts. in the '80s, i was staunch anti-communist. i didn't pay attention to south africa. all i knew the anc was being backed by comb anytime munists learned that south africa was wrong. if you feel really strongly about this man, you can still act, because there's plenty of people around the world who are under the thumb of evil. and there's a lot of celebrities who don't care. there are women still being circumcised in africa. it's
't even tell his anc colleagues that he was doing that. they negotiated for years in private in order to get this done. the persistence, the courage to do that was incredible. >> incredible courage and many occasions, he went against the leadership of the anc, the political movement. and didn't tell them or when he did tell them, he would essentially say i know this is not what you want me to do, but i feel it is the thing we must do and almost all instances, he was proven correct and he was somebody -- >> go ahead, had the respect of them so that they trusted him even though they had great reservations about the other side. >> they had great reservations. they argued with him. but never the less, he was so deserving of trust that even when they disagreed with him, they knew he was the leader and not the leader in a sense of i'm in charge, but in a sense of i am the purpose, the vision, the one who's going to get us there, so trust me. come along with me. walk with me and that was his great strength. >> thank you so much. >> we'll have much more on the life of nelson mandela and talk
of the guerrilla army, the formation, the armed wing of the anc and the chief of intelligence. slate got this succession of people from different parts of the liberation movement taking over who had been out of the country for longer to time, or had been imprisoned for laundries of time. and to a certain extent that shape some of the mistakes that have been made in the last yea years. >> does thabo mbeki talk but what surprised we came back after all those years and except? >> want to thank you quickly learn when you interview people or politicians and political power is nothing ever surprise them. so the main thing that upset him every time i was into being and is, i would ask that question what would surprise you to what was unusual, what jumped out at you? every, i would say that he would lean back, take a look at me with a lizardlike look when you know you have irritated him. and that would come. know, my brother, never surprised. never admit you were surprised. i think the things that surprised thabo mbeki certainly who was the second president of the liberated south africa was exte
. the police raided this farm 50 years ago and arrested members of the anc. mandela was on his way back to his farm when he was arrested the by a roadblock, beginning the long, long prison sentence he served behind bars. man came to light candles and lay flowers. many events taking place, this is what a spokesman for the family has to say. >> on behalf of thema of of thea family, we have grave sadness for the passing of nelson mandela two days ago. >> the words of nelson mandela of what became known as the ra rabonia trial. he said i have stood against white domination. i have stood against black domination. i have always cherished a society of democracy where people can live in opportunity. >> racial integration is still a problem in south africa. after two decades an ever the end of apartheid we talk with an interracial couple in johannesburg to see the challenges they face. >> nelson mandela brough fought inequality, and now today couples don't have to hide their relationship but being a mixed race couple still has their challenges. >> people have accepted that we have merged, but not this
movement, that we do the right thing around apartheid. mandela, he's with the a.n.c., and some considered that to be a terrorist organization. we had solidarity with people on the ground. we saw an opportunity to make sure that the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to africa and that was to make sure that we did not continue to support apartheid. >> tell us about his influence on the united states policy. >> he did not abandon friends. for example, something that i know president clinton has talked about, he always disagreed with president mandela on the issue of cuba and on his relationship with fidel castro. president mandela was not one to forget his friends. he also had such an impact on the african union and creation of the african union, making sure the countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interest of their people. sometimes that would not be necessarily what was in the best interest of our countries. he really works to make sure that it wasn't just the people of south africa has benefited from the struggle but that all people around
opponent of nelson mandela once a member of the anc and once a leader of the abuntu home land. what does this tell you about mandela. >> when he talked to us i don't think he saw in me a leader. i think he saw one of his sons or a neighbor. the relationship between the two of us culminated into a number of issues. i ended up being tasked by him on handling some sensitive issues of him at home and installations of hit his grandsn and weddings and you will see everything is in order there it was a joy to work with him and i always consider myself to have been lucky that i was one of the few in this world who was working closer to this icon. >> now you remember too we are standing outside of his home. those years that this home was filled with tear gas and people were being shot. what role did mandela play in changing that from what it was then to what it is now. >> i think we should com come m from being bold. we walked from his home and then he says stop what you are doing. it's not in the interest of the black south africans that you are killing one another. and then after that he relat
, safety in numbers, at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation deteriorating, violence abroad and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything. we found and were able to report back to our respective party leaders, and i had half an hour with an anxious, worried and very uncertain margaret thatcher. we reported back on the tragic success of apartheid in separating one person from another, on the urgency of the need for change to avoid a looming catastrophe and how the united kingdom's public position also needed to change. but we also and apparently rather unusually reported some hope. i said in the house there is a large group of people in south africa who many have ignored. they are those of all races who are working patiently for fellowship and reconciliation in pure human terms by meeting each other and sharing their lives and experiences. some of those with whom we stayed were white opponents of apartheid and have been so for decades, but all -- white and black finish were people who realized that the abolition of the legislat
a year to be members of the anc's customer loyalty program. they get at $10 discount after every $100 ticket purchases but now anc promises, quote, a chance to own a piece of the action at the same price as wall street investors, taking $2,500 of new stocks with no fees, the same terms to amc employees, hoping to raise $400 million in total, riegle is the nation's largest theater chain up 20% in the past 12 months but the customer loyalty program and to spin, studies show canceled on to a stock longer than regular investors. rather than sell and bailout true fans can buy more of it after a dip. tracy: my mom has one of those. dennis: this will be an interesting plan for moviegoers to buy stock they never would have heard about. ashley: this might follow suit. dennis: will free might be on that. ashley: as marijuana is legalized in some states one man is hoping to smoke industry competition in an attempt to establish what he calls the anheuser-busch of marijuana. justin hard field is investing in everything from retail stores, emerald green capital, sees a lot of green on the marijuana
congress, the anc, was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962, mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sent to life in prison. for years, for decades, the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times, he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. >> rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey mandela >> in 1989, south africa's hard line president resigned, replaced by f.w. de-clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban of the anc was lifted and on february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked to freedom. >> nelson mandela, free at last a
want to address if you want and keep ance company it issue. the president was speaking for the american people. insurancespeaking for companies. which doesn't make him a liar. you can keep your insurance it.any if you want he wasn't speaking for the insurance company. i would like to address also to guests, what are epublicans doing to help this country? thank you? >> scott wilson, some of how the public perception is on some of the issues of the health care law. the president t if you quently about like your insurance plan, you plan, p your insurance that was a pithy way that people ho try to get their insurance, the vast majority of americans, should not fear the new legislation. it did not turn out to be the case. the fact of the matter is that the legislation was written in a way to weed out insurance that were not meeting minimum standards set out by the law. so the white house knew that that was not going to be the case for every american. they just saw it was going to be a small percentage of americans who were not going to be able to keep their plans. generalized in a way that w
of the a.n.c. during the '60s, who died and perhaps was killed by the south african government. a person with home your viewers may be aware of steve, murderedered in 1977. >> as we move forward and look at south africa and the issues and problems do you feel the legacy and mess age has been >> the legacy, and it goes back to the same people who fathered the youth league. south africa must be a place in which there's self determination. it goes back to the congress, going back to all who lives within it, everyone that participates in the governing structure. >> thank you for your insight. we appreciate it. >> french president issued a veiled warning to the leader of the central african republic. francis hollande warned it would be tough to keep central african republic's president in place given the worsening violence. 400 bodies have been found in the capital in the past three days. 10,000 fled the city. everyone has been ordered off the streets bar peacekeepers and bars. some images from this report may be disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. this is new to the city
economic and political waters. with the political icons demise the future of the a.n.c. is being thrown into question. mike hanna reports from johannesburg. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. in the void left by nelson mandela's death, an awareness of challenges to come. the growing gap between rich and poor is a reminder of nelson mandela's promise of a better life is to be realised. >> i think the challenge we have for nelson mandela is to face the reality that if we don't do something for everybody, the young people will revolt, because if they remain poor and others are richer then they revolt. >> the fault lines within south african society is all-too clear of it was a labour dispute ruling in the killing of 30 at the mary carna mine -- marikana mine. many argue that the root cause was a government losing touch with those that put it in power. >> if you look at what happened over the last few years in terms of public violence, you can see that we have many, many people that don't feel represented by those in government. and the resort to violence is because we don'
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
the sharp though massacres of nineteen sixty two nd day and date of the anc decided on armed struggle and there were all those years that followed where mandela was imprisoned and it was a lot of violence the movers were called and the frontline states. how did that happen that transformation and calm so that there was. he's a peaceful transition. we'll post our apartheid south africa. i have been nice will the hokkaido in addition to the whitley the push to get it the old people are a team in the political activity in south africa that was to be the key was on the whole crew monday and i went into hiding. and at the euro happen all the options you can try at the armstrong. we know what happened after that call. the try of the group in ireland and the leaders of the season the apartment and into the ocean the young man who was working patient who was angry was when the two week as the model used this week on the porch looking at he underwent an hour or so the duration. even when the warden the presumption to commission appointed by the week. archbishop who wrote about yesterday. due t
assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when you see these images. thank you. appreciate that. the image of bill clinton at robben island, what an amazing treat to see that up close. >> you've got world leaders going there, including he was very critical of george w. bush over the iraq war and bush is heading down there. he was critical of the united states way back in 2003. i think he said if there's a krntd has committed unspeakable an frosties, it is the united sta
of knee-jerk reaction against any sort of antiestablishmentarian action such as that taken by the anc, but if you're going to put nelson mandela in that terrorist category, you'd have to put george washington there for rebelling against the british in the name of freedom. i mean, that's -- >> gene, suppose there was a country where blacks held the whites in servitude, made them carry passbooks, wouldn't allow them to do anything. do you think somebody might be looking to their second amendment rights to try to change this? >> yeah. >> familiar. >> it sounds like it's a different standard, like this woman out in nevada -- "i might have to use my second amendment rights." suppose the president was from another tribal group or a different racial ethnic group and you had no rights. do you think you might resort to those second amendment? the idea of saying he resorted to violence is like saying george washington resorted to violence. >> exactly, exactly, exactly. that's the parallel that comes to mind. and look, you know, nelson mandela and his memory will live on aeons, centuries beyond
. risk on is pretty much the theme this morning. the s&p 500 is within spitting ance of setting another record high. a stronger dollar would be lower gold prices, but gold has already lost 26% in terms of the u.s. dollar this year. joining me now with a look at what the charter thing about where it is headed from here is greg bender who used to trade oil futures. there are short-term considerations and long-term considerations when you look at chart. trap had a classic bear about which happens when you get below a certain level of and it can only stay down there for a day or two to and then immediately rally back up. we will the catching a lot of short-term traders short. now in the january futures, we're back above the 200 day moving average. a long-term trend line that we had been back above for a while. trades isnd line with what to watch. >> does that mean that the short-term traders are changing their positions as well? >> they can have the ability to move in and out pretty quickly. they put on their most bullish bets than july. bythese are being driven data questions, and the bett
he was released from prison at his home. withs my husband in 1986 theer tonbo who was heading a.n.c. when nelson was in prison. but when you went to south was likeen, it futilism. it was hard to explain to americans and others throughout how utterly devastated beingsority of the human who lived in south africa were. back in when i went 1998, which was about four years the first re-election, a friend of mine invited me to out on to the beach. and i had never stepped on the beach before because it had "whites only" and i didn't feel capable of stepping -- and walking on to beach, it was like shields were lifted from my eyes because to see the been able beauty of capetown before. families, muslim families, asian families, white families running on the beach. to nelson mandela. >> absolutely. >> pretty incredible. liberations. >> thank you so much to our entire panel. bright, selloake hatang. we'll be back after this break. >> all this week we've been talking about bubbles in housing, stocks, i.p.o.s. but there's one bubble that's, perhaps, bigger than the rest. bitcoin, the value of th
that. he had a great adviser who was head of the finance arm of the anc and also later became head of finance for the country who recognized that south africa had to maintain its integrity as a free market economy. and you simply couldn't give away all of the wealth and turn it over to the black south africans because in many ways they weren't prepared. you couldn't take the gold mines and turn it over to the miners. his idea was a little bit a form of affirmative action and a form of a policy called black participation in that blacks were invited to join the boards and become shareholders under a process of many of the large state-inspired companies. so he -- he was clear that the -- that a free south africa without the respect of the global marketplace in the free marketplace wouldn't be in the best interest of black south africans trying to move into the middle class. and i think he came to that very early on as he transitioned out of being a prison and head of the anc to president of a nation. >> robert, thank you very much for joining us this morning. and sharing your remembra
and ance for local leaders as well, in terms focus tong the overall problem solving. third, i suspect over a short period of time a large grassroots network of people who are looking for problem solvers in their elected officials, probably a million people in every congressional district in this country is what we want to have in the next several months. i think we're a good part of the way there. so if you think of no labels, i think of problem solving. i want you to think of a group that's also proving the concept. it isn't just catchy phrases and nice sound bites, but we're we're justneedle and getting it going. and i'm excited about where this is leading to, because we have nation.e in this we have no choice. ahead will have to be about problem solving. t will be about getting taxes right, debt right, education right, getting the foundational building blocks of this nation in a place where we can actually get our house in order. that's what it so desperately needed right now. so we're delighted to be here. we thank you for listening here. thank you for what you're doing to chair this s
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
was what? >> well, it's a long time ago. in 1951 there was an anc african national conference, which was in the hot bed of the apartheid government up there, and there was a meeting which was the annual meeting which used to take place in different cities in johannesberg every year, and mandela was there, and he was there at that time appointed as the youth leader of the anc, and also as the volunteer and chief of the defiance campaign which had been decided up to -- to start next -- in the following year, in 1952. the people were extremely nervous at the conference, because they were worried that the -- the government or the africanas, the racists would start problems about them having a conference in their midst, in their capitol city, and except for mr. mandela, i photographed him and talked to him and found him terribly relaxed. >> did his personality -- his potential come through to you on -- on film in those early days? >> well, he was terribly self disciplined and calm. and this surprised me in comparison with all of the other leaders, rushing around like chickens and terribly
hold hands and realise the dream that nelson mandela wanted. >> the anc are having problems. they are not the anc of nelson mandela's scandals. there's corruption scandals, break away parties and they are dealing with a lot of things. poverty. the gap between rich and pure. where you are, standing in the street in sa wetto, examples of this very close to you. >> the street i'm in now is designed for tourists. a lot of money went into the area. they struesed up the place. turists have african meals, music and dance. it's a great way to remember nelson mandela, and for the country to earn money. the way people live here, some conditions are shocking. people don't have running water, electricity. there's huge unemployment here. a large amount of people who are jobless are the youths. they are acting questions to jacob zuma, to the a number of c, what are you doing about it. those are the issues being faced much the biggest thing on people's minds is the corruption scandal. it's alleged jacob zuma used taxpayer money po build his home. it is huge. it has a swimming pool. all sor
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)